Alcoholism treatment participation factors: Personality, acculturation, and severity

Heather Jean Dawson, Fordham University

Abstract

A biopsychosocial model has been formulated to describe the complex, interdependent client factors and characteristics associated with alcoholism. This study examined three selected elements from this model, which were personality, severity of addiction, and, for a Hispanic sample, acculturation, and explored their impact on treatment participation and on counselors' assessment of patients' progress. No personality factors were correlated with participation or progress in treatment. Severity of dependence on alcohol was positively correlated with progress in treatment but no severity of dependence measure, either for alcohol or drugs, was found to be correlated with treatment participation. For Hispanic clients, acculturation was not correlated with participation or progress in treatment. The combined and additive effects of both the personality factor of control and a global measure of severity predicted participation in treatment. The second-order personality factor of independence emerged as the only predictor of progress in treatment when alcohol and drug severity were analyzed in combination. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical|Psychology, Personality

Recommended Citation

Heather Jean Dawson, "Alcoholism treatment participation factors: Personality, acculturation, and severity" (January 1, 1996). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI9631026.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9631026

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