Mentorship style preferences of businesswomen of color and White businesswomen

Nancy Ellen Scott, Fordham University

Abstract

Mentorship style preferences of businesswomen of color and White businesswomen were investigated to determine whether race was a factor in mentorship style preference. One hundred and sixty-one female volunteer graduate business students who were enrolled in the Columbia University School of Business completed the Mentorship Demographic Questionnaire (MDQ) and the Mentorship Style Preference Questionnaire (MSPQ).^ A one-way MANOVA revealed that there was no significant difference in mentorship style preference between business women of color and White businesswomen based on a comparison of the two subscale scores--task and emotion--on the MSPQ.^ However, further statistical analysis revealed several interesting correlational findings. There were many, and varied, statistically significant (P. $<$.05) correlations found between selected MDQ demographic variables and MSPQ subscales for the total sample, businesswomen of color, Asian businesswomen, and White businesswomen. Findings of the correlational studies are discussed in terms of differences between the groups, and possible avenues to explore in terms of mentorship style preference.^ Implications and recommendations for future research are offered. ^

Subject Area

Business Administration, Management|Psychology, Industrial|Education, Business

Recommended Citation

Nancy Ellen Scott, "Mentorship style preferences of businesswomen of color and White businesswomen" (January 1, 1996). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI9631051.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9631051

Share

COinS