The influence of preservice teachers' cognition, behavior, and perceived self -efficacy on teaching performance during a mentored internship

Ann Mary Jablonski, Fordham University

Abstract

The preparation of individuals to become competent teachers was the subject of this exploratory investigation. Selected influences on the teaching performance of preservice interns were examined. Conceptual foundations were Bandura's perceived self-efficacy theory, Newell and Simon's information-processing theory, and research on teacher effectiveness.^ Perceived self-efficacy, cognitive skill, and basic teaching techniques as well as selected status characteristics, measures of knowledge of subject matter, knowledge of teaching practices, and working conditions during internship were hypothesized to affect teaching performance in a causal model.^ The sample included a cohort of 16 post-baccalaureate women and men who successfully completed an elementary preservice-teacher education program. Program design included an Instructional Training Laboratory (ITL) and a year-long mentored teaching internship.^ Teaching Performance was assessed using the Reading and Mathematics Observation System to code videotapes of interns' teaching during the ITL and the internship. Perceived self-efficacy was measured with questionnaires. Cognitive skill was assessed through interviews with interns using a stimulated recall technique with videotapes and grade books as stimuli. Basic teaching techniques were assessed using principal's evaluations, lesson plans, and mentor comments on lesson plans. Other measures were obtained from program records.^ Path analysis of the causal model was conducted using LISREL. The goodness-of-fit of model to data was assessed using chi-square statistic, GFI, AGFI, root mean square residual, and Q-Q plot.^ In a six-variable model that fit the data, variables measuring procedures and routines for engaging students and cognitive skill had direct effects on the end-of-year productive teaching activity. Knowledge of teaching practices directly affected summer teaching performance and indirectly affected end-of-year productive teaching activity through the procedures and routines variable.^ An alternative model based on Bandura's concept of reciprocal determinism was constructed. Variables from the six-variable model were hypothesized causally to affect end-of-year self-efficacy. End-of-year productive teaching activity directly affected self-efficacy. Cognitive skill and procedures and routines each indirectly affected self-efficacy through teaching activity. Knowledge of teaching practices directly affected summer teaching and indirectly affected self-efficacy. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration|Education, Educational Psychology|Education, Teacher Training

Recommended Citation

Jablonski, Ann Mary, "The influence of preservice teachers' cognition, behavior, and perceived self -efficacy on teaching performance during a mentored internship" (1996). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI9708260.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9708260

Share

COinS