The role of identity style as a moderator variable in the relationship between undergraduate academic stress and negative psychological outcomes

Daniel F Blum, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to investigate the role of identity style as a moderator variable in the relationship between undergraduate academic stressors and psychological impairment (depression and anxiety.) The subjects were 103 undergraduate students who took a course in introductory psychology during the Spring, 1996 semester. The sample was 68% female and 74% White, with a mean age of 18.8 years (SD = 1.2). Negative life events were assessed with the College Student Life Event Schedule (Sandler & Lakey, 1982); Identity style was assessed with the revised Identity Style Inventory (Berzonsky, 1992); depression was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, 1967); and anxiety was assessed with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spielberger, 1983). Results indicated a positive relationship between quantity of negative life events and depression. An expected positive relationship between quantity of negative life events and anxiety was not obtained. Diffuse/avoidant and normative identity styles operated as moderating variables in the relationship between quantity of negative life events and depression. An expected moderating influence of informational identity style was not obtained in the relationship between negative life events and depression, nor were expected moderating effects of any identity styles obtained for the relationship between quantity of negative life events and anxiety. Practical applications of the research for improving the lives of college students are discussed. ^

Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology|Psychology, Developmental

Recommended Citation

Daniel F Blum, "The role of identity style as a moderator variable in the relationship between undergraduate academic stress and negative psychological outcomes" (January 1, 1998). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI9825878.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9825878

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