The influence of knowledge accessibility on strategies used to solve verbal analogies

Kenneth Ellis Woolley, Fordham University

Abstract

An experiment was conducted in which the interaction between strategy use and the accessibility of relevant conceptual knowledge was investigated. Participants were instructed in the use of a componential strategy for solving verbal analogy problems, and performance on a subsequent task was assessed with respect to items containing different levels of vocabulary and relationship familiarity.^ The familiarity of problem content was varied in a between-subjects fashion in order to manipulate knowledge accessibility and initial experiences with the componential strategy. Performance data were gathered in the form of response times and the occurrence of errors. Confidence ratings were also recorded for each response to the problem solving task. In addition, participants responded to questionnaires regarding the perceived efficacy of the strategy. A second trial was included in the design to evaluate the extent of strategy maintenance.^ Results confirmed the effectiveness of the componential strategy training, but failed to show any interaction between strategy use and the accessibility of relevant knowledge. However, knowledge accessibility did seem to affect the way in which the strategy was perceived. Participants rated the componential strategy as more useful, easier to use, and requiring less effort when their initial experience with the strategy involved solving analogy problems based on more familiar vocabulary and relationships. ^

Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology|Psychology, Cognitive

Recommended Citation

Kenneth Ellis Woolley, "The influence of knowledge accessibility on strategies used to solve verbal analogies" (January 1, 1998). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI9839524.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9839524

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