The effect of Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment program on perceived control in retarded performers

Abraham Herzel Bodinger, Fordham University

Abstract

An experimental group (n = 394) of elementary and high school retarded performers—students “at risk” of academic failure—were exposed to Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment (IE) program over a period of 1 academic year and were compared to a nonprogram group (n = 442) of similar academic and demographic background with respect to changes in their perceived control and control-related beliefs as measured by the Wellborn et al. (1989) Student Perception of Control Questionnaire. ^ Results indicated that, in comparison to their peers in the nonprogram (control) group, students in the IE group were more inclined to attribute differential academic achievement to effort than to luck and felt more competent in controlling and applying effort. They felt more competent in affecting powerful others and perceived their own personal attributes as modifiable. They were less inclined to perceive school outcomes as “noncontingent events” and less inclined to attribute differential academic success to external causes. In sum, results indicate that IE does enhance perceived control in retarded performers and thus, lend support to Feuerstein's assertion that IE does affect nonintellective determinants of academic achievement in retarded performers. ^

Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology|Education, Special

Recommended Citation

Abraham Herzel Bodinger, "The effect of Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment program on perceived control in retarded performers" (January 1, 2000). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI9988416.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9988416

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