Gender roles, racial and gender attitudes, and training level influences on perceptions of the supervision experience

Jennifer Anne Wells, Fordham University

Abstract

This research investigated several psychosocial variables anticipated to have a significant impact on the process and outcome of the clinical supervision experience. Specifically, the importance of gender and racial-diversity-related issues was examined to determine the extent to which it influenced supervisee and supervisor overall ratings of the supervision experience. Although gender and race are two of the more immediately recognizable variables at the onset of the training relationship, there is a sparsity of empirical research which focuses on the extent to which attitudes regarding gender and race affect the outcome of the supervision encounter. ^ The participants consisted of 158 graduate Psychology supervisees of which 95 were at the beginning/advanced practicum level and 63 were predoctoral interns. Sixty-four PhD level supervisors also participated in the study. Each participant completed four survey instruments designed to assess demographic information; gender-role orientation; attitudes toward gender equity and racial-diversity-related issues. Also measured were ratings of the importance of gender- and race-related issues and the subsequent effect on evaluations of the respective supervisee, supervisor, and overall supervision experience. ^ Results of this investigation revealed several findings. As counselors advanced in their professional training and clinical experiences, the importance of gender- and race-related issues increased. It was also determined that a noteworthy percentage of the participants included in this study had not received training in clinical supervision and more alarmingly, many had not received training in multicultural counseling. In terms of attitudes toward gender equity and racial-diversity-related issues, the results demonstrated a significantly positive correlation between participants' diversity-related attitudes and perceptions of the importance of gender- and race-related issues. Ratings of satisfaction with one's supervisee or supervisor was partially dependent upon participants' perceptions of congruent perspectives on the importance of gender- and race-related issues. ^ Implications for future research are expected to include analysis of specific methods for assessing supervisee and supervisor competence to provide clinical supervision and therapy in which multicultural issues are addressed satisfactorily. Qualitative studies are anticipated to provide in-depth assessment of the impact of psychosocial variables including racial identity development. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Developmental|Psychology, Clinical|Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies

Recommended Citation

Jennifer Anne Wells, "Gender roles, racial and gender attitudes, and training level influences on perceptions of the supervision experience" (January 1, 1998). ETD Collection for Fordham University. Paper AAI9988418.
http://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9988418

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