Presenter Information

EMW 2008

Description

The topic in 2008 was "Law: Continuity and Change in the Early Modern Period." It was chosen because various shifts in the legal sphere are among the many changes that mark the early modern period as transitional. These include issues of communal self-governance as well as the relationship of Jews to the laws and courts of the lands in which they lived. The participants looked at the primary texts through both an historical and a jurisprudential lens, and engaged in an interdisciplinary dialogue about how law evolves, and how it affects and is affected by historical developments. The 2008 workshop addresses these questions in an attempt to understand better what types of legal developments are characteristic of the early modern period. As in previous workshops, topics were considered from a multi-regional perspective. Edward Fram focused on the role of print in the popularization and codification of Jewish law; Yaron Ben Naeh presented text of Jewish cases in Ottoman courts; Adam Teller discussed legal status of Jews and Jewish courts in Poland-Lithuania; Benjamin Ravid highlighted the nexus between baptism and charters for Jews and Marranos in Venice; Barbara Staudinger presented texts of Jews in imperial courts in the Holy Roman Empire; David Horowitz and Ann Oravetz discussed questions of the herem in Hamburg and Amsterdam respectively; Miriam Bodian focused on Amsterdam Regulations of 1616 concerning the Jews, and Kenneth Stow explored questions of common law (ius commune).

Event Website

http://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/emw/emw2008/

Start Date

17-8-2008 5:00 PM

End Date

19-8-2008 5:00 PM

Location

Yeshiva University, New York

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Aug 17th, 5:00 PM Aug 19th, 5:00 PM

Law: Continuity and Change in the Early Modern Period

Yeshiva University, New York

The topic in 2008 was "Law: Continuity and Change in the Early Modern Period." It was chosen because various shifts in the legal sphere are among the many changes that mark the early modern period as transitional. These include issues of communal self-governance as well as the relationship of Jews to the laws and courts of the lands in which they lived. The participants looked at the primary texts through both an historical and a jurisprudential lens, and engaged in an interdisciplinary dialogue about how law evolves, and how it affects and is affected by historical developments. The 2008 workshop addresses these questions in an attempt to understand better what types of legal developments are characteristic of the early modern period. As in previous workshops, topics were considered from a multi-regional perspective. Edward Fram focused on the role of print in the popularization and codification of Jewish law; Yaron Ben Naeh presented text of Jewish cases in Ottoman courts; Adam Teller discussed legal status of Jews and Jewish courts in Poland-Lithuania; Benjamin Ravid highlighted the nexus between baptism and charters for Jews and Marranos in Venice; Barbara Staudinger presented texts of Jews in imperial courts in the Holy Roman Empire; David Horowitz and Ann Oravetz discussed questions of the herem in Hamburg and Amsterdam respectively; Miriam Bodian focused on Amsterdam Regulations of 1616 concerning the Jews, and Kenneth Stow explored questions of common law (ius commune).

http://fordham.bepress.com/emw/emw2008/emw2008/1