Genetic Approaches to Monitoring Change over Space and Time in Lake Tahoe Basin Chipmunks (Genus: Tamias)

Christina Fennell Frare, Fordham University

Abstract

This dissertation applies population genetic analyses to broadly sympatric chipmunk taxa (Genus Tamias) to test hypotheses about the impact of taxonomy on monitoring, the differential response of closely related organisms to environmental pressures and the predicted patterns of genetic change in high elevation populations over time. We focus on the four most common species of chipmunk (T. quadrimaculatus, T. speciosus, T. amoenus, and T. senex) in the Lake Tahoe Basin (LTB). Genetic methods for identifying the four most common Lake Tahoe Basin chipmunk species, indicated that sensitive species were commonly overestimated. In addition genetic measures of change over time suggest that allelic diversity has been lost in the highest elevation sites. Finally, comparative analyses of genetic connectivity throughout the basin identified factors that may impact gene flow differentially among these closely related taxa.^

Subject Area

Biology|Ecology|Conservation biology

Recommended Citation

Frare, Christina Fennell, "Genetic Approaches to Monitoring Change over Space and Time in Lake Tahoe Basin Chipmunks (Genus: Tamias)" (2015). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI10187292.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI10187292

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