The Impact of Neurocognition, Culture, and Depression on the Subjective Experience of Suboptimal Medication Adherence and HIV Symptomology for People Living with HIV

Armando Fuentes, Fordham University

Abstract

Research indicates that compromised neurocognitive functioning and depression, respectively, negatively impact adherence to HIV medications and HIV symptomology. To date, no literature examines how these factors relate to the specific reasons people living with HIV endorse for missing their medications. Further, there is a paucity of research focusing on HIV-positive Latinas/os. The current study sought to explore the relationship that neurocognition, culture, and depression have with reasons for missing medications and HIV symptomology in a predominantly Latina/o sample. Study analyses showed a relationship between depressive symptomology and experiencing a greater number of HIV symptoms. Exploratory analyses demonstrated relationships between functioning in select neurocognitive domains and specific reasons for missing medications; a relationship between depressive symptomology and specific reasons for missing medications; and a relationship between ethnicity and medication adherence. Implications for future research directions and culturally appropriate adherence interventions and psychoeducational materials are discussed.^

Subject Area

Medicine|Psychology|Clinical psychology

Recommended Citation

Fuentes, Armando, "The Impact of Neurocognition, Culture, and Depression on the Subjective Experience of Suboptimal Medication Adherence and HIV Symptomology for People Living with HIV" (2017). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI10282706.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI10282706

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