The Associations Between Parental Involvement and Science Achievement via Children's Perceived Academic Competence and Academic Effort

Alyson Willcox Fitzpatrick, Fordham University

Abstract

Advances in technology expand the instructional options for teachers to modify and individualize students’ educations. Educational technology has been linked to positive school outcomes, such as self-efficacy, achievement goal orientation, and achievement in the United States and other countries. However, these relationships have not been established in Latin American countries. The current investigation used extant data to examine how varying levels of exposure to technology and/or the use of a computer-based instructional program (i.e., Khan Academy) are related to student math self-efficacy, achievement goal orientation, and math achievement outcomes for Guatemalan elementary school students. Findings indicated that a significant positive relationship existed between mastery orientation and math efficacy, mastery orientation and math achievement, and math efficacy and math achievement for third grade. A significant negative relationship existed between achievement and performance-avoidance orientation. Results also revealed mastery and efficacy as positive predictors for third-grade math achievement, while performance-avoidance was found to be a negative predictor. For sixth grade, a significant positive correlation was found between mastery orientation and math efficacy, and mastery orientation and achievement. Regression results also supported mastery as the only significant predictor of sixth-grade achievement.^

Subject Area

Education|Educational psychology|Psychology

Recommended Citation

Fitzpatrick, Alyson Willcox, "The Associations Between Parental Involvement and Science Achievement via Children's Perceived Academic Competence and Academic Effort" (2018). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI10828298.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI10828298

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