The Effects of Microaggressions on the Relationship Between Trauma Exposure and Trauma Symptoms

Evan Emile Joseph Auguste, Fordham University

Abstract

Microaggressions are a common way in which racism is experienced in the U.S. The purpose of the current study was to examine to what extent microaggressions have a unique effect on trauma and depression after controlling for other traumatic event exposures. Additionally, the study examined self-reported stress ratings of microaggression exposures. The paucity of quantitative analysis on microaggressions has been central to many criticisms of microaggression research. As such, the associations of microaggressions with trauma and depressive symptoms were quantitatively assessed in a sample of 75 young adults of color. A mediation model found that the association between microaggressions and depressive symptoms was significant after accounting for traumatic event exposures. A moderated-mediation model found that traumatic stress symptoms mediated the association between self-reported microaggressions and depressive symptoms. These results suggest that microaggressions are a clinically relevant factor in understanding mental health problems in people of color in the United States. Research and practice implications are discussed.^

Subject Area

Clinical psychology

Recommended Citation

Auguste, Evan Emile Joseph, "The Effects of Microaggressions on the Relationship Between Trauma Exposure and Trauma Symptoms" (2018). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI10930239.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI10930239

Share

COinS