Binge Eating in College Women: Body Dissatisfaction, Self-Compassion, and Expectancies for Mood Regulation

Andrea Spacone Pratt, Fordham University

Abstract

Binge eating disorder is defined as eating an objectively large amount of food in a discrete time period while experiencing a loss of control over one’s eating behavior. Research and theory on eating disorders frequently identifies sociocultural factors such as body image as a main factor in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. Building on these models, a biopsychosocial model of eating disorders takes into account biological factors and psychological factors as well as sociocultural factors. This study examined the relationship among self-compassion, body dissatisfaction, expectancies for negative mood regulation, and binge eating behavior among a sample of 202 female college students. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were utilized to examine the relationship among these variables. Results indicated that both body dissatisfaction and expectancies for negative mood regulation significantly mediated the relationship between self-compassion and binge eating behavior. Furthermore, body mass index was found to be significantly related to binge eating behavior in the model investigating the relationship between self-compassion and expectancies for negative mood regulation. Results contribute to the understanding of how self-compassion works to impact binge eating behavior through expectancies for negative mood regulation and body dissatisfaction.^

Subject Area

Behavioral psychology|Women's studies|Counseling Psychology|Personality psychology|Higher education

Recommended Citation

Pratt, Andrea Spacone, "Binge Eating in College Women: Body Dissatisfaction, Self-Compassion, and Expectancies for Mood Regulation" (2019). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI10936577.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI10936577

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