Gendered Islamophobia and Sense of Belonging: Experiences of Visibly Muslim Women in Higher Education

Scott B Swisher, Fordham University

Abstract

The current study examined experiences of gendered Islamophobia and sense of belonging among visibly Muslim women at U.S. institutions of higher education. Using a phenomenological research approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 visibly Muslim female students at U.S. universities and colleges in the Northeast. Conventional content analysis of the interviews yielded nine major themes and seven sub-themes. Of the major themes, the lack of knowledge about Islam and Muslims held by non-Muslim peers and faculty informed much of the participants’ experiences at their university or college. The results also revealed the importance of access to in-group members, prayer space, and safe spaces (e.g., Muslim Student Association) for the study’s participants. The major themes and sub-themes, as well as implications for U.S. institutions of higher education, and areas of future research were discussed.^

Subject Area

Educational sociology|Women's studies|Multicultural Education|Higher education

Recommended Citation

Swisher, Scott B, "Gendered Islamophobia and Sense of Belonging: Experiences of Visibly Muslim Women in Higher Education" (2019). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI10976272.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI10976272

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