Self-Regulated Learning, Math Achievement and Self-Efficacy of High School Students with Learning Disabilities

Elizabeth B Fuentes, Fordham University

Abstract

Research has shown that students with learning disabilities who have experienced consistent failures display low academic self-efficacy. Research has also demonstrated that self-efficacy is a key component in academic performance and motivation. Academic interventions are often used to target skill deficits for students with learning disabilities. Interventions teaching students to assess their skills and strategy use with opportunities for mastery are not as thoroughly researched with students with learning disabilities, yet research has demonstrated their effectiveness in changing both academic performance and self-efficacy in varied populations. This study utilized a multiple probe design across behaviors to examine changes in math achievement when an intervention that presented both self-regulation learning skills and Khan Academy was presented to adolescents with learning disabilities. Results revealed that the intervention was functionally related to changes in math achievement for all three replications. Self-efficacy was monitored during the study, and changes were observed for two of the three replications.

Subject Area

Disability studies|Mathematics education|Educational psychology|Secondary education

Recommended Citation

Fuentes, Elizabeth B, "Self-Regulated Learning, Math Achievement and Self-Efficacy of High School Students with Learning Disabilities" (2019). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI13883422.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI13883422

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