Miami is a paradise. Miami is home. I hate Miami: Cultural Capital and Habitus of Three Cuban-El Salvadoran Second-Generation Sisters Carving Out Their Lives in Their Native City

Bianca Mijares, Fordham University

Abstract

Thesis directed by O. Hugo Benavides, Ph.D. This thesis is the result of two months of ethnographic research on a Cuban family in Little Havana. My research focuses primarily on the second-generation children of the household: Layla and Maya, 25 year old twins, and Gala, 20. I argue that the women's habitus, influenced by larger socio-economic cultural forces, plays an important role in their current economic situation. I also argue that cultural capital is used as a tool of exclusion towards the youngest sibling in regionally specific ways to mark a class difference between the sisters. The aim of this paper is to shed light on and contribute to the existing knowledge of the experiences of second-generation immigrants in the city of Miami.^

Subject Area

Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies

Recommended Citation

Mijares, Bianca, "Miami is a paradise. Miami is home. I hate Miami: Cultural Capital and Habitus of Three Cuban-El Salvadoran Second-Generation Sisters Carving Out Their Lives in Their Native City" (2014). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI1561150.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI1561150

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