Discrimination, psychological well-being, and the role of ethnic/racial identity among ethnic/racial minority adolescents: Two longitudinal studies

Kristina Kulkarni, Fordham University

Abstract

This thesis examines the effects of ethnic/racial discrimination on minority adolescents’ psychological well-being and identifies the circumstances in which ethnic/racial identity serves as a protective or aggravating factor. Instances of discrimination and psychological well-being were measured every day for 14 days in one sample of minority adolescents (N = 51) and once a year for three consecutive years in a second sample of adolescents (N = 354). Hierarchical linear modeling showed a concurrent day effect in which increased negative mood and tension/anxiety were observed on the same day as a reported discrimination event. Findings also revealed moderating effects of ethnic/racial identity in the relationship between ethnic/racial discrimination and psychological well-being. Private regard was found to exacerbate the influence of daily discrimination, while centrality and low levels of private regard operated as a buffer. This work provides support for a directional relationship between discrimination and psychological well-being among multi-ethnic youth. Implications of these findings for ethnic/racial discrimination research and the field of health disparities are discussed.^

Subject Area

Developmental psychology|Clinical psychology

Recommended Citation

Kulkarni, Kristina, "Discrimination, psychological well-being, and the role of ethnic/racial identity among ethnic/racial minority adolescents: Two longitudinal studies" (2015). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI1601365.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI1601365

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