An investigation of the relationships among performance anxiety, perfectionism, optimism, and self-efficacy in student performers

Christina Marie McQuade, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationships among performance anxiety, perfectionism, optimism, and self-efficacy. The sample included 139 undergraduate students who were studying one of the following performance arts: theater, acting, music, musical theater, dance, or speech arts. The majority of participants were matriculated students at a four-year college or university, while a smaller group was attending a postsecondary performing arts institution that specializes in musical theater. All participants signed an informed consent form and completed a background questionnaire, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Life Orientation Test-Revised, and the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale. Participants received all of these documents in person or in the mail. There was one principal researcher who administered and scored all of the questionnaires. Correlational analyses revealed significant and negative relationships between performance anxiety and optimism, and performance anxiety and self-efficacy. The results of a standard multiple regression analysis indicated that perfectionism, optimism, and self-efficacy were predictive of performance anxiety. These findings highlight the importance of understanding how intrapersonal factors may be influencing students' experiences of performance anxiety.

Subject Area

Music|Theater|Educational psychology|Personality psychology

Recommended Citation

McQuade, Christina Marie, "An investigation of the relationships among performance anxiety, perfectionism, optimism, and self-efficacy in student performers" (2009). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3361368.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3361368

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