Relationships between attachment and psychological well-being in Hispanic American and non-Hispanic White college students

Daphne Stuart McCampbell, Fordham University

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between parental attachment, adult attachment, and psychological well-being among Hispanic American and non-Hispanic White college students. There were 166 participants, 84 of whom were Hispanic American (50.6%), and 82 of whom were non-Hispanic White (49.4%). In terms of parental attachment, results indicated higher maternal and paternal attachment among non-Hispanic White college students than Hispanic American college students. Concerning parental and adult attachment, results indicated ethnicity moderated the impact of paternal attachment on adult-attachment related anxiety. Also, it was the unique contribution of attachment to one's father, or paternal attachment, as opposed to parental attachment, that was a significant predictor of adult attachment relationships. In terms of psychological well-being, results indicated maternal attachment, as well as adult attachment-related anxiety, as significant predictors of each of Ryff's psychological well-being scale across ethnicities, except for autonomy. This study's findings suggest ethnic differences in the relationship between paternal attachment and adult attachment-related anxiety, as well as among the subscales of Ryff's scale. Limitations and clinical and research implications of this study are discussed.

Subject Area

Counseling Psychology

Recommended Citation

McCampbell, Daphne Stuart, "Relationships between attachment and psychological well-being in Hispanic American and non-Hispanic White college students" (2012). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3518869.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3518869

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