Situational and intrapersonal predictors of school and life satisfaction of elementary school students

Amy Linden Drost, Fordham University

Abstract

This study examined predictors of school and life satisfaction of fifth-grade students. Two situational predictor variables (school climate and school stress) and two intrapersonal predictor variables (locus of control and academic self-concept) were examined. It was hypothesized that positive school climate, low levels of school stress, internal locus of control, and positive academic self-concept would predict school and life satisfaction. It was also hypothesized that school satisfaction would serve as a mediator between the predictor variables and life satisfaction. Surveys were administered to 152 fifth graders in four elementary schools in a New Jersey school district. Results of regression analyses indicated that positive school climate, positive academic self-concept, and internal locus of control predicted school satisfaction. Positive school climate and positive academic self-concept predicted life satisfaction. School satisfaction did not serve as a mediator between the four predictor variables and life satisfaction. Exploratory analyses indicated that racial differences were present, with Black students reporting lower levels of school stress and greater levels of life satisfaction than their White peers. The results of this study contributed to the scant literature on elementary school age children's life and school satisfaction by laying the groundwork for school personnel to develop effective interventions aimed at improving students' school satisfaction and overall life satisfaction before students reach high school and present with serious consequences of dissatisfaction, such as school failure and school drop out.^

Subject Area

Education, Elementary|Education, Educational Psychology

Recommended Citation

Drost, Amy Linden, "Situational and intrapersonal predictors of school and life satisfaction of elementary school students" (2012). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3521767.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3521767

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