African American urban high school assistant principals: Self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and aspirations to be a principal

Robert Finley, Fordham University

Abstract

The position of assistant principal is underrepresented in the extant body of education literature. Yet, at the same time, the position is viewed as the profession's pathway to the principalship. In the midst of the dilemma, this qualitative study endeavored to explore the backgrounds, roles, accomplishments, and future career aspirations of high school assistant principals in the New York City public school district. ^ Utilizing school data, on-site observations, information from pre-interview demographic questionnaires, and one-on-one interviews, the researcher sought to determine respondent's sense of self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and aspirations to be a principal. Approximately six African American high school assistant principals agreed to participate in the study: three male and three female all between 34 and 54 years old. ^ The findings indicated the majority of assistant principals in the study evidenced positive levels of self-efficacy, appeared satisfied with their professional careers, and expressed a desire to become a school principal. Moreover, the study findings also suggested that influential African American education role models might have motivated some study assistant principals to achieve and aspire to the principalship. ^ Respondent's age and gender does not appear to be a source of influence in predicting their sense of personal self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and aspirations to be a principal. In conclusion, the findings can be useful to education stakeholders, policymakers and superintendents interested in gaining greater insights about African American assistant principals in the New York City public school district. Additionally, the study may serve as a catalyst motivating other researchers to conduct similar research.^

Subject Area

African American Studies|Black Studies|Education, Leadership|Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

Finley, Robert, "African American urban high school assistant principals: Self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and aspirations to be a principal" (2013). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3557846.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3557846

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