Positive stereotyping of doctoral psychology trainees of color in multicultural competence training

Naoko Hashimoto, Fordham University

Abstract

The present study investigated whether the positive stereotyping of trainees of color as if they are multicultural competence experts, within a context evaluating trainees' multicultural competence, is associated with increased anxiety. Second, the study examined whether participants utilize suppression as an emotion regulation strategy to stem positive stereotype threat. Quantitative data were collected from a sample of 156 doctoral students in counseling and clinical psychology programs. Results revealed significant differences in levels of state anxiety between groups as measured by self-report with the State subscale of the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory and by indirect responses on the dot probe task, warranting rejection of the null hypotheses. However, post hoc analyses revealed an unexpected pattern of state anxiety across the groups. Results also indicated that participants who were positive stereotype threatened and given suppression instructions had significantly lower state anxiety than the control group.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Counseling|Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies

Recommended Citation

Hashimoto, Naoko, "Positive stereotyping of doctoral psychology trainees of color in multicultural competence training" (2013). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3601925.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3601925

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