Assessing the problem solving styles, implicit beliefs, and resilience of West Point Cadets

Cherylynn Marino, Fordham University

Abstract

This study examined the relationships between problem solving style, implicit beliefs of emotion and cognition, and psychological resilience. One hundred U. S. Army cadets were administered VIEW: An Assessment of Problem Solving Style, implicit belief statements based on Carol Dweck's theory, and the Connor Davidson Resilience Scale. Incremental views of emotion and cognition significantly related to resilience. Regression analyses revealed modest significant support for incremental beliefs of cognition and emotion, accounting for approximately 10% of cadet resilience. Results showed that problem solving styles as measured by VIEW were not significant indicators of psychological resilience. A modest significant effect was found between Task styles and incremental belief systems. Future research may seek to further explore and extend these relationships with other populations. Implications regarding resilience theory with military personnel are discussed.^

Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology|Military Studies

Recommended Citation

Marino, Cherylynn, "Assessing the problem solving styles, implicit beliefs, and resilience of West Point Cadets" (2014). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI3621691.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI3621691

Share

COinS