THE PRINCIPAL'S ROLE IN TEACHER COLLECTIVE NEGOTIATIONS AND ON-JOB DISCRETION

ROBERT ANTHONY PAULINE, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the role of principals in teacher negotiations and principals' perceived discretion as a result of teacher contracts.^ One hundred and sixty-five principals in two New York State counties responded to a survey questionnaire which (1) grouped them according to negotiations role and (2) determined their level of managerial discretion through a ten-factor questionnaire item.^ Three statistical procedures were performed. First, Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient was used to determine the extent to which the ten contract items worked together to detect differences in administrator discretion. Second, analysis of variance was performed and, third, regression analysis to test the relationship between negotiations role and managerial discretion.^ It was determined that negotiating role (negotiator, active consultant, passive advisor, non-participant) and school district size (number of principals in the district) were significantly related to differences in principals' on-job discretion. Size and role were significant at .05 while the overall relationship proved significant at the .001 level.^ Through regression analysis it was determined that the role of negotiator and active consultant provided principals with higher levels of perceived on-job discretion than passive advisor and non-participant.^ Thus it appears that principals' role in teacher collective negotiations, as well as school district size, are major determinants of principals' on-job discretion in areas such as assigning pupils, teacher discipline, calling additional meetings, and other managerial powers. Though school district size proves to be important, it does not diminish the effect of role in collective hegotiations for principals in this study.^ Apparently principals should, then, be active, but consultative, members of the school board's negotiating efforts with teachers. Data do not indicate, however, that sitting at the bargaining table provides principals with any stronger discretionary authority than being active as consultants in the negotiating process. Clearly, though, principals should participate in the negotiations effort to protect their own jobs and autonomy. Being passive advisors or non-participants shows the lowest levels of resulting authority. ^

Subject Area

Educational administration

Recommended Citation

PAULINE, ROBERT ANTHONY, "THE PRINCIPAL'S ROLE IN TEACHER COLLECTIVE NEGOTIATIONS AND ON-JOB DISCRETION" (1983). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8308489.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8308489

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