EFFECTS OF TWO METACOGNITIVE STRATEGIES ON INFERENTIAL COMPREHENSION SKILLS OF ESL COLLEGE STUDENTS (READING)

ANGELA CANDELARIO, Fordham University

Abstract

This study sought to determine the effectiveness of the Schema-Direct Monitoring Strategy (SDMS) and the Schema-Question-Answer-Relationship Strategy (SQARS) on the inferential comprehension skills of ESL college students.^ Subjects for this investigation were 141 randomly selected college students classified as average or below average readers as measured by the Interamerican Reading Test (IRT) scores. Subjects were divided into below average, average and above average levels of English proficiency according to College Entrance Examination Board Test Scores. Eight course sections were randomly assigned to treatment conditions.^ The SDMS emphasized the use of a flowchart that provided students with a structure to monitor their reading. The SQARS' emphasis was on instructing students to determine the Question-Answer Relationship and to identify the answer as text-based or knowledge-based. Schema instantiation strategies were used in both treatments.^ The Inferential Skills Test (IST) was constructed to measure subjects' inferential comprehension performance. A questionnaire was administered to assess students' affective responses.^ Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance to compare the two treatments, the reading levels and the proficiency levels, as well as to determine whether there was interaction between treatment conditions and proficiency levels. The students' questionnaire yielded qualitative data on their reactions to both treatments.^ Significant differences were found between treatments, with the mean of the SDMS significantly higher. No significant differences were found in reading or proficiency levels, nor significant interactions between treatments and proficiency levels. Significant differences were found in the posttest gain scores of students using metacognitive strategies. Sub-group analysis revealed significant differences only in the average readers/below average proficiency subgroup. Questionnaire data revealed highly positive reactions to both treatments.^ This investigation demonstrated that metacognitive training that provides a climate of inquiry permitting students to activate prior knowledge, hypothesize and monitor their reading enhances ESL students' inferential comprehension performance.^ Research comparing metacognitive strategies in first language and second language and investigating the reciprocal relationship between monitoring and self-confidence will extend the results of this investigation. ^

Subject Area

Reading instruction

Recommended Citation

CANDELARIO, ANGELA, "EFFECTS OF TWO METACOGNITIVE STRATEGIES ON INFERENTIAL COMPREHENSION SKILLS OF ESL COLLEGE STUDENTS (READING)" (1986). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8616818.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8616818

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