PERCEIVED INFLUENCE OF PEERS, PARENTS, AND TEACHERS ON FIFTH- AND NINTH-GRADERS' PREFERENCES OF READING MATERIAL (INTERESTS, INDIVIDUAL)

RHODA BIRNBAUM SHORE, Fordham University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences in the selection of reading materials due to the effects of three reference groups--peer, parent, and teacher, upon children at different grade levels (grade 5--10.6-11.8 years old and grade 9--14.6-15.8 years old) and of different sex.^ Two hundred forty students, 120 males and 120 females, representing grades five and nine, were randomly selected from classrooms in a northern New Jersey school district.^ A researcher designed book selection instrument was used to measure perceived sociological group influence on students' choice of reading material. The subjects were asked to rank order three choices of books given them for each set of questions.^ A three-way classification analysis of variance was utilized to test the hypotheses. The findings of the study indicated the followng: (a) there was a significant difference among students' perceived influence of three reference groups; (b) there was a significant interaction between influence of reference group and grade level; (c) there was no significant interaction between influence of reference group and sex; and (d) there was no significant interaction among influence of reference group, grade level, and sex.^ A major conclusion was that younger children, both males and females, are influenced more by parents and teachers, than they are by peers, in their selection of reading materials. In addition, older children, both males and females, are influenced more by peers, than they are by parents and teachers, in their selection of reading materials. Supplementary analysis revealed that influence of individual preference is the primary determinant in selection of reading materials. Further, individual preference is a stronger influence for adolescents than it is for younger children.^ As implications for learning and teaching, the investigator pointed out that: (a) teachers should create ways so as to encourage students to introduce good literature to their peers and to promote group-oriented discussions, and for themselves to provide and influence literature-related activities; (b) parents should be encouraged to promote literary activities at home in order to develop their child's interests in books; and (c) students' individual interests in reading material should be sought for the purpose of promoting greater motivation and increased reading development. ^

Subject Area

Education, Reading

Recommended Citation

SHORE, RHODA BIRNBAUM, "PERCEIVED INFLUENCE OF PEERS, PARENTS, AND TEACHERS ON FIFTH- AND NINTH-GRADERS' PREFERENCES OF READING MATERIAL (INTERESTS, INDIVIDUAL)" (1986). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8616829.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8616829

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