ORAL COMMUNICATION APPREHENSION AMONG BUSINESS COLLEGE STUDENTS AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY (PUERTO RICO)

NEREIDA DELGADO-MONGE, Fordham University

Abstract

This study examined the occurrence of oral communication apprehension among 180 business college students in a private university in Puerto Rico. The focus was on the relationship between oral communication apprehension and English language proficiency.^ The Personal Report of Communication Apprehension (PRCA) (McCroskey, 1970) was administered to categorize the subjects into three levels of oral communication apprehension--low, moderate, and high. The Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency (MTELP) was used to assess students' English language proficiency. A researcher-made questionnaire was used to collect data on personal and educational backgrounds.^ A Pearson product-moment correlation determined whether a relationship exists between oral communication apprehension and English language proficiency. A factor analysis was applied to determine whether the 24 variables on the PRCA scale could be described more effectively by a reduced number of common factors. The varimax rotation was used to redefine the factors in order to make sharper distinctions in the meanings of the factors. A multiple regression analysis to predict the relationship between the identified factors and the dependent variable was the last statistical technique applied to the data.^ The most relevant findings are: (1) No significant correlations were found between English language proficiency total scores and oral communication apprehension; (2) Significant correlations resulted between the subtests of MTELP and oral communication apprehension; (3) The 24 variables on the PRCA scale were grouped into four common factors and; (5) Factor four--Cognitive and bodily responses to speech--accounted for most of the English language proficiency variance.^ Given these results, it was concluded that: (1) No matter what level of oral communication apprehension students may be at, their English language proficiency is the same; (2) Further measurement and theoretical studies of the oral communication apprehension construct are needed since this study found a different set of factors; and (3) Factor four--Cognitive and bodily responses to speech--presents the idea of anxiety resulting from cognitive and bodily responses to making a speech. ^

Subject Area

Language arts

Recommended Citation

DELGADO-MONGE, NEREIDA, "ORAL COMMUNICATION APPREHENSION AMONG BUSINESS COLLEGE STUDENTS AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY (PUERTO RICO)" (1986). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8624478.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8624478

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