MICROCOMPUTER INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY IN ADMINISTRATIVE DECISION-MAKING

LOUIS A. CIOTA, Fordham University

Abstract

The focus of this study was on the decision-making process followed by administrators who have implemented computer programs. The purpose of this study was to provide those educators faced with decisions about the implementation of a computer program with specific information on how others also faced with computer program design made decisions which resulted in an effective program.^ In addition, the study sought to identify components of effective programs through a synthesis of the literature. This was deemed of value since educational computer literature has not offered this information to those educators engaged in computer program development.^ Eight districts with computer programs were studied using case study methodology. Key administrators were interviewed in each district using the Hill Decision-Making Model as a framework with which to measure administrative decision-making activity. Simultaneously, information was gathered regarding the district's computer program. The district's computer program components were compared to the components of effective computer programs as determined by the synthesis of the literature. A final comparison of each district's administrative decision-making process and the degree of its program effectiveness was completed in an effort to reach conclusions and implications.^ The study concluded that there is a relationship between following a decision-making process and the degree of effectiveness in the district's computer program. It also found a number of other factors which diminished a district's computer program effectiveness. They were: (a) failure to recognize in-district resources; (b) avoidance of new developments in education; (c) failure to fully understand the role of schools in society; and (d) failure to recognize the current skill needs in the work force.^ Implications drawn from the study's conclusions follow two areas: decision-making and design of computer programs. In the area of decision-making, school districts should recognize decision-making as a key administrative function. Giving this full consideration, school districts should adopt a formal decision-making process; preferably in the form of a practical model such as Hill's. When designing computer programs, districts must take a careful look at how their program meets the needs of students presently and in the future. Districts that emphasize programming skills are missing the importance of teaching that the computer is a tool which should be integrated into all subjects and be recognized as holding an important place in business and industry. ^

Subject Area

Educational administration

Recommended Citation

CIOTA, LOUIS A., "MICROCOMPUTER INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY IN ADMINISTRATIVE DECISION-MAKING" (1987). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI8715793.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI8715793

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