Perceived stress, depression and sibling conflict in adult children caring for a parent with Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia

Deirdre Gisela Modesti, Fordham University

Abstract

This research examined differences in the reported stress, depression, and negotiation of parent care for adult children caring for a parent with Alzheimer's disease or Vascular dementia. The sample consisted of 179 adult child caregivers to a non-institutionalized parent, who were not only children. Significant differences were found between primary caregivers and their siblings on all of the measures employed. Differences between subgroups were also explored and found to be significant. An unmarried female had the greatest likelihood of becoming a primary caregiver. Results reflect that adult child caregivers are suffering from a stress level significantly higher than the rest of the population. At least half of the the caregivers were suffering from moderate to severe depression. On average, the sample responded affirmatively to one third of the questions regarding difficulties negotiating care of a parent with a sibling. In addition, subjects, on average, endorsed half of the questions regarding whether steps had been taken toward institutionalizing the parent. Interventions are recommended that specifically focus on sibling negotiation of parent care as well as the detection of signs of strain in the caregivers. ^

Subject Area

Gerontology|Clinical psychology

Recommended Citation

Modesti, Deirdre Gisela, "Perceived stress, depression and sibling conflict in adult children caring for a parent with Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia" (1994). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI9425200.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9425200

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