Learning to read and write: Exploration of literacy models presented to students who are labeled learning disabled

Linda Tartaglione, Fordham University

Abstract

Children who were labeled "Learning Disabled" were videotaped over a 2-week period. A case study approach of the models of literacy which were presented to 11 children was used to analyze which models were presented and supported by their teachers. Over this period, six sessions were gleaned as representative samples of what occurred within that classroom.^ The following were hypothesized: (1) Teachers must not interrupt children as they interact with text. (2) Learning must be child centered. (3) A major strategy used with children labeled LD is connecting. (4) Overpraising can become overwhelming and unbelievable. (5) Scaffolding is an excellent strategy to use with children labeled LD. (6) Discussion of concepts generated from text is important. (7) Predicting should be used often. (8) A variety of strategies are used in reading. (9) An integrated program of reading and writing is the best for teaching reading to children who are labeled LD. (10) Time is an important factor for DLD (Designated LD) children; they must have enough. ^

Subject Area

Education, Special|Education, Teacher Training|Education, Reading

Recommended Citation

Tartaglione, Linda, "Learning to read and write: Exploration of literacy models presented to students who are labeled learning disabled" (1994). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI9511251.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9511251

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