The differences in social service utilization between elderly United States mainland -born Blacks and West Indian -born Blacks

Beverly Pauline Lyons, Fordham University

Abstract

This study is a cross-sectional survey, using secondary data, to determine whether there are differences in the factors that affect utilization of formal social supports by elderly American-born Blacks and West Indian-born Blacks living in New York City.^ The data for this study were taken from a large scale survey of older people in New York City--Growing Older in New York City in the 1990's--undertaken jointly by Fordham University and Columbia University for the New York Community Trust. Data were collected in 1990 by Louis Harris and Associates, a national survey research firm in New York City.^ The population from which this sample of 388 Black participants was drawn, consisted of 1570 individuals, whose names were listed on New York City's Medicare list. A modified adaptation of Andersen's and Ward's models was used to organize the variables as predisposing, enabling and need factors. Multi-variate statistical techniques were used to analyze the data.^ Findings suggest no difference between U.S. mainland-born Blacks and W.I.-born Blacks in the degree of service utilization, although there were some variations in the use of specific services. In general, a large proportion of both study groups used health services, however, they utilized the available social services to a lesser extent.^ Although findings showed no difference in service utilization, there are some inherent cultural differences that could affect other areas of life, particularly help-seeking behavior among the study groups. Social workers must be sensitive to specific sub-group differences of Blacks. ^

Subject Area

Gerontology|Social work|Ethnic studies

Recommended Citation

Lyons, Beverly Pauline, "The differences in social service utilization between elderly United States mainland -born Blacks and West Indian -born Blacks" (1994). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI9534289.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9534289

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