The effects of educational *attitudes on the acceptance of cooperative education as academic learning by college faculty

Jennifer Jones, Fordham University

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between what faculty believed about teaching and learning--educational philosophy--and faculty acceptance of cooperative education as academic learning in higher education. Research was conducted for two purposes: (a) to determine the relationship of urban faculty members' progressive or traditional orientation with their attitude toward cooperative education as academic learning, and (b) to assess the attitudes of faculty in using cooperative education for undergraduate student development in four areas: integrating theory and practice, critical-thinking skills, problem-solving skills, and maturity.^ The study determined each member's (a) degree of traditionalism and progressivism, and (b) attitude toward the use of cooperative education as academic learning. Kerlinger and Pedhazur's (1967) instrument was used to determine a faculty member's philosophical orientation and to address two additional statements regarding student application of academic knowledge to the marketplace, and the rewarding of academic credit for internship.^ Data were used to identify faculty, who were categorized for interviewing. Interviewees were asked about their attitude toward academic use for four areas: (a) integrating theory with practice, (b) critical-thinking skills, (c) problem-solving skills, and (d) maturity. Analysis revealed that all faculty were supportive of cooperative education. This was linked to faculty perception of its purpose, which was to socialize underprepared students for middle-class professional careers.^ A second finding showed that cooperative education had limited impact on the curriculum and classroom. It appeared to coexist and thrive because it did not intrude on academic departments, and it complemented field experiences.^ Respondents gave a mixed response to questions regarding the use of cooperative education for the four areas listed above. Although the faculty saw the potential of cooperative education for integrating theory and practice and maturity, most of them did not view the development of critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as an outcome.^ Cooperative education was part of the mission of the College and was considered important for student development. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Jones, Jennifer, "The effects of educational *attitudes on the acceptance of cooperative education as academic learning by college faculty" (1998). ETD Collection for Fordham University. AAI9839509.
https://fordham.bepress.com/dissertations/AAI9839509

Share

COinS