Presenter Information

Yaacob Dweck, Princeton University

Description

This presentation examines Leon Modena's critique of Kabbalah, a Hebrew treatise composed in Venice in 1639 entitled Ari Nohem (The Roaring Lion). One of the primary causes of Modena's critique was the printing of kabbalistic books such as the Zohar, Ma'arekhet ha-Elohut, and Sefer Yetzirah. In Modena's argument, the printing of kabbalistic books in the sixteenth century had disrupted prior patterns of the transmission of kabbalistic knowledge. In particular, Modena argues that kabbalistic books had begun to be read in new ways by new audiences. Using Modena's analysis as a point of departure this presentation will focus on two questions: First, how did Leon Modena himself read kabbalistic texts? Second, did a new group of readers of kabbalistic texts indeed appear in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?

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Event Website

http://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/emw/emw2009/

Comments

Audio and video of the workshop are available with each presentation and on iTunesU

Start Date

24-8-2009 1:00 PM

Location

Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies, Harvard University

 
Aug 24th, 1:00 PM

Leon Modena's Ari Nohem Between Print and Manuscript

Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies, Harvard University

This presentation examines Leon Modena's critique of Kabbalah, a Hebrew treatise composed in Venice in 1639 entitled Ari Nohem (The Roaring Lion). One of the primary causes of Modena's critique was the printing of kabbalistic books such as the Zohar, Ma'arekhet ha-Elohut, and Sefer Yetzirah. In Modena's argument, the printing of kabbalistic books in the sixteenth century had disrupted prior patterns of the transmission of kabbalistic knowledge. In particular, Modena argues that kabbalistic books had begun to be read in new ways by new audiences. Using Modena's analysis as a point of departure this presentation will focus on two questions: First, how did Leon Modena himself read kabbalistic texts? Second, did a new group of readers of kabbalistic texts indeed appear in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?

This presentation is for the following text(s):

Click here to view the video.

https://fordham.bepress.com/emw/emw2009/emw2009/6