Description

Recent attention to Jewish demography and to the spatial characteristics of Jewish residential patterns has demonstrated that in more than one region, Early Modern Jews were associated with each other more loosely, and less locally, than has previously been imagined. The "communities" to which Jews may have felt they belonged are difficult to know as they are likely to have varied with economic or social status, gender, age, and ethnic origin. The testament translated below is that of a merchant woman in the first years of the existence of the Florentine ghetto (founded 1571). The study of early modern bequests has proven an important resource for the study of early modern female piety in Catholic contexts; here, in addition to what we learn about the spiritual goals of the testator, we may study this testament as documenting one of the earlier articulations of her social commitments that express a sense of Jewish communal belonging and becoming.

This presentation is for the following text(s):

  • Testament of Ginebra Blanis, 1574 (Testamentum 128, Archivio di Stato di Firenze (ASF), Notarile Moderno Testamenti 767, 167r-v)

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Event Website

http://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/emw/emw2010/

Start Date

16-8-2010 9:00 AM

Location

Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT

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Aug 16th, 9:00 AM

Communities Developing in Association with Place: Testament of Ginebra Blanis, 1574

Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT

Recent attention to Jewish demography and to the spatial characteristics of Jewish residential patterns has demonstrated that in more than one region, Early Modern Jews were associated with each other more loosely, and less locally, than has previously been imagined. The "communities" to which Jews may have felt they belonged are difficult to know as they are likely to have varied with economic or social status, gender, age, and ethnic origin. The testament translated below is that of a merchant woman in the first years of the existence of the Florentine ghetto (founded 1571). The study of early modern bequests has proven an important resource for the study of early modern female piety in Catholic contexts; here, in addition to what we learn about the spiritual goals of the testator, we may study this testament as documenting one of the earlier articulations of her social commitments that express a sense of Jewish communal belonging and becoming.

This presentation is for the following text(s):

  • Testament of Ginebra Blanis, 1574 (Testamentum 128, Archivio di Stato di Firenze (ASF), Notarile Moderno Testamenti 767, 167r-v)

https://fordham.bepress.com/emw/emw2010/emw2010/3