Document Type

Article

Keywords

analytic philosophy of science, art, biotechnology, causality, computer age, continental philosophy of science, experience, gene, Human Genome Project, Gestell, Martin Heidegger, internet, Thomas Kuhn, machination, Machenschaft, measuring, mechanization, natural science, nature; Friedrich Nietzsche, passion in science; philosophy of science, representation, research, science in practice, applied science, stem-cell research, technology, theory, truth, virtuality, Wissenschaft

Disciplines

Continental Philosophy | Language Description and Documentation | Other Linguistics | Philosophy | Philosophy of Science

Abstract

Nietzsche and Heidegger pose important philosophical questions to science and its technological projects. The resultant contributes to what may be called a continental philosophy of science and I argue that only such a rigorously critical approach to the question of science permits a genuinely philosophical reflection on science. The resultant contributes to what may be called a continental philosophy of science and I argue that only such a rigorously critical approach to the question of science permits a genuinely philosophical reflection on science. More than a thoughtful reflection on science, however, the heart of philosophy is also at stake in such reflections. The author argues that if Nietzsche proposes the resources of art to defend us against truth and the deadly insights of tragic knowledge, then Nietzsche’s more arresting claim turns is his equation of science and art, just as Heidegger aligns techne and poiesis. For Nietzsche, science and art draw upon the same creative powers and both science and art are directed to the purpose of life.

Article Number

1006

Publication Date

2007